Question on wood-burning insert or stove for NH home

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,360
Central Mass
Have you looked at a kuma sequoia insert? When I was looking I found those to be about the largest insert I could find.
I think the insert and free stander are the same, you just dont attach the legs if you use as an insert.
 

adatel

New Member
Feb 25, 2019
17
New Hampshire
I visited the Woodstock factory and I am sold! I am going to buy an Ideal Steel. Any recommendations for good chimney sweeps in southern new hampshire who will install this for me (including the stainless chimney liner) into my hearth? I asked Woodstock and they gave me three named but they won't come to southern NH :-( Thanks again and I look forward to posting pictures when everything is set up. Meanwhile, I have wood seasoning in my open walled shed and a lot more coming... lots of chainsaw and axe action these days!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,599
South Puget Sound, WA
What will you be using to convect the heat?
 

adatel

New Member
Feb 25, 2019
17
New Hampshire
What will you be using to convect the heat?
The stove will be halfway out of the (very high) firebox and the ceilings are high and I have large (cold) windows so I was thinking that as long as I have the chimney/flue well sealed, I will get a lot of natural convection currents flowing into and around the room because of the different temperature gradients. I am sure it would be more effective & efficient with a blower (which is why I was thinking of the BK Sirocco) but aesthetically the IS works better... I am going for all black with blank black steel side panels -- so I get the industrial look in black.

This is not optimal for a heat distribution perspective but I still think the IS is going to throw so much heat that I will be a lot warmer in the great room space (and the MBR which is directly above) and reduce my propane usage a lot when I am in the house. My central blower main intake is just off the great room so I am also curious whether turning on the fan (which is variable speed) will help circulate the warm air through the house.

But if you think this is all a stupid plan or there are alternatives that wouldn't be aesthetically problematic (ie, I am not going to put a box fan on the hearth :)), I would really appreciate your perspective... I wish I could run a couple side by side or sequential experiments but who has the money and time for that?!

Broader context: I realized that since I am not in the house all the time (3-4 days/week), the woodstove will only ever be a supplement to some other strategy for reducing propane (and high carbon releasing heating). So, in the mid-term, I am hoping to get together enough money to install a geosource heat pump (I have plenty of meadow space and ground water for closed or open loop, my propane hot air furnace is 20 years old and my WH same, so I will need to replace them in next 5-10 anyway so I would swap out before that happens) with PV on my big south-facing steep roofs of house & barn to generate the electricity for the heatpump, pool pump etc, but that is all about $50K I think which is a lot but no more 7K per year in propane & electricity... I think I could get a 7 year breakeven and then I am paying nothing for heating, cooling and charging my electric truck and tractor... all of that with a very low carbon footprint. Or, I could be deluded. :)
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,599
South Puget Sound, WA
Ceiling fans in the room will help and can be configured to create a convective loop.
 
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kyguylal

New Member
Oct 6, 2018
64
New Hampshire
I'm also in southern NH with a house very similar. We're heading about 3,500sf and our stove room has 16' ceilings with an entire wall made out of glass.

What part of Southern nh? I'm in Windham and I know a few chimney guys and wood guys with aged wood
 

adatel

New Member
Feb 25, 2019
17
New Hampshire
I'm also in southern NH with a house very similar. We're heading about 3,500sf and our stove room has 16' ceilings with an entire wall made out of glass.

What part of Southern nh? I'm in Windham and I know a few chimney guys and wood guys with aged wood
Hi, I am in Temple which is about an hour west of you out 101 before Peterborough; people who work in the Nashua area will usually come west to Temple; if you have any recommendations for chimney pros, I would appreciate it. I guess there is a private conversation function that you can use to send to me. thanks very much for taking the time!
 

EbS-P

Member
Jan 19, 2019
94
SE North Carolina
I think I have 41”+/- from the front of the hearth to the back of the fireplace. With a top vent there is no need for ember protection on the floor as I meet the 16” door to front of hearth requirement. Choose cat or non cat first. That will help you narrow down your choices. If it were my fireplace I would put in a Jøtul F600 top vent. Looking at you dimensions is seems like a plausible fit. You have a fresh air intake I would take advantage of that and hook it up to the stove. I would install a block off plate too.
149612AB-3D8C-44D8-BED9-FF33A3C11050.png

With an opening that big you will be able to see the liner and they are not very athletic so that should be addressed, not sure how maybe someone else here can help. My first thought would be pre-insulated liner painted black with stove or grill paint. As for a blower I have one sitting on the fireplace floor with the ash pan you can’t even tell it’s there. I really like the ash pan BTW. Just my two cents. Evan
DD657A08-6A90-4B70-98A1-19BF0A576905.jpeg
 
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adatel

New Member
Feb 25, 2019
17
New Hampshire
I think I have 41”+/- from the front of the hearth to the back of the fireplace. With a top vent there is no need for ember protection on the floor as I meet the 16” door to front of hearth requirement. Choose cat or non cat first. That will help you narrow down your choices. If it were my fireplace I would put in a Jøtul F600 top vent. Looking at you dimensions is seems like a plausible fit. You have a fresh air intake I would take advantage of that and hook it up to the stove. I would install a block off plate too.
View attachment 244557

With an opening that big you will be able to see the liner and they are not very athletic so that should be addressed, not sure how maybe someone else here can help. My first thought would be pre-insulated liner painted black with stove or grill paint. As for a blower I have one sitting on the fireplace floor with the ash pan you can’t even tell it’s there. I really like the ash pan BTW. Just my two cents. Evan
View attachment 244558
Thank you, Evan. I would like to get a catalytic due to reduced emissions (and arguably increased efficiency and burn time), so that is why I am leaning toward the Ideal Steel. Aesthetically, it also works very well with my modern furniture, etc.

I like your idea about the blower and will see whether I can get something that is inconspicuous enough. I will also look into the ceiling fan idea.

Also, you are right that I will need to do something aesthetically about the pre-insulated liner going up the chimney although since the IS is pretty high, it won't be very visible ... only about 8 inches between top of stove and bottom of firebox lintel.
 

georgepds

Minister of Fire
Nov 25, 2012
873
Woodstock makes good stoves, but there is the caveat that none have a blower option. In this circumstance a blower will make a significant difference in convecting the heat. This can help deliver more heat more evenly in a big space, especially when used in conjunction with a ceiling fan.

Umm... my understanding is that the soapstone ones heat by radiation, and do not need a blower
 

georgepds

Minister of Fire
Nov 25, 2012
873
Re "
The big caveat is unless you have a proven verified source of wood that has been properly stored and seasoned for two full years you are up for nothing but frustration if you install a stove this summer and try to burn this fall."

Not my experience (northern Ma), nor is it the experience of folks who studied it in Alaska. One season is effective for drying wood. Store it in an area open to wind and sun and top cover it.

Don't get me wrong ,dry wood is better than wet, but you can dry it in New England in a season. In the event that he moisture content is too high at the end of the summer season ( I suspect some people try to store their wood in a pine covered glacial valley under a waterfall) .. just mix it with bio bricks to lower the average moisture content
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,599
South Puget Sound, WA
Umm... my understanding is that the soapstone ones heat by radiation, and do not need a blower
Convection is usually preferable with a stove in a fireplace and especially with a high ceiling. The masonry is going to soak up a lot of the radiant heat. However, seeing this is an interior fireplace a ceiling fan may provide adequate circulation of the warm air.
 

georgepds

Minister of Fire
Nov 25, 2012
873
Convection is usually preferable with a stove in a fireplace and especially with a high ceiling. The masonry is going to soak up a lot of the radiant heat. However, seeing this is an interior fireplace a ceiling fan may provide adequate circulation of the warm air.
Ahhh.. thanks for the explanation..
 

adatel

New Member
Feb 25, 2019
17
New Hampshire
Convection is usually preferable with a stove in a fireplace and especially with a high ceiling. The masonry is going to soak up a lot of the radiant heat. However, seeing this is an interior fireplace a ceiling fan may provide adequate circulation of the warm air.
Hmm... Does that mean that the most energy efficient installation would be to line my firebox and flue block with a reflective radiant barrier (foil-like) which would reflect the radiant heat back into the room rather than heating the fireplace/chimney mass? (Not sure this would be aesthetically acceptable to me, but just curious about the hypothetical.)
 

georgepds

Minister of Fire
Nov 25, 2012
873
Hmm... Does that mean that the most energy efficient installation would be to line my firebox and flue block with a reflective radiant barrier (foil-like) which would reflect the radiant heat back into the room rather than heating the fireplace/chimney mass? (Not sure this would be aesthetically acceptable to me, but just curious about the hypothetical.)
On the hypothetical side I note my Woodstock Progress hybrid has heat shield in back, which reduces radiation into the hearth...

If you are not irradiating the hearth, does the original argument hold?
 
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georgepds

Minister of Fire
Nov 25, 2012
873
Re " ( I suspect some people try to store their wood in a pine covered glacial valley under a waterfall) ."

More seriously, I suspect local climate plays a big role in the difference in time to season from one wood user to the next. Consider the difference between a chord of wood in death valley versus one in the close to waterfall conditions of Seattle

My guess is the chord sitting in the death valley sun will be more likely to cure in one season than the chord in Seattle that is covered in slugs, snails, and other rain adoring creatures.
 

adatel

New Member
Feb 25, 2019
17
New Hampshire
On the hypothetical side I note my Woodstock Progress hybrid has heat shield in back, which reduces radiation into the hearth...

If you are not irradiating the hearth, does the original argument hold?
The Ideal Steel has a bottom heat shield and an optional rear heat shield; if those are designed to reflect radiant heat then that (especially the rear one) would be good for me to include... I guess I can contact Woodstock to find out the engineering rationale for those heat shields.