What a nice long run

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
4,226
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
I found this yesterday looking up wood stove for sale on Facebook market place.
View attachment 236509
Keep an eye on that guy, he is going to be selling a new wood stove every year ("...and THIS BRAND sucks too, just like the last ten!!!!")


Also... there's not enough resolution to zoom in much, but...

SmartSelect_20181225-085555_Chrome Beta.jpg

Is that duct tape around the top?
 
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peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
4,638
Northern NH
You dont get creosote if you are burning hot and clean. I expect when that church install is used that poor stove is running flat out on hopefully dry wood.
 

Kevin Weis

Minister of Fire
Mar 3, 2018
783
Union Bridge, Md
Back in the day (1800's) those long runs of pipe is what heated a lot of public buildings. They would be taken apart nearly daily to clean out and reassembled. Probably had one person dedicated to this task. Kevin
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,683
South Puget Sound, WA
This install was posted several years back. At least it had enough pitch to stay fairly clean according to the poster.
too long pipe.jpg
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,683
South Puget Sound, WA
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Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
511
Palmyra, WI
Around here there is an open air museum - 100acres with a small town and farmsteads replicating the mid 1800s. I look at their stove setups and wonder how they survived. Long pipeing runs like those pictured, suspended by stove wire, small hearth pads, leaky box stoves. A few larger buildings have the stove in the center, chimney off to the side with 10 to 30ft horizontal runs. Most smaller houses and buildings had tiny tin sheet hearth pads with wood floors beneath and all around. But they seem to have done alright.
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
511
Palmyra, WI
The problem with looking at historical installations is that you only see the lucky ones that didnt burn to the ground.
The family farmhouse here had an old cookstove in the kitchen. Redoing the kitchen floor several years ago meant patching and replacing the burned out floor boards where the stove once stood. It's use would have dated to the 30s and before. Most of the rural homes around are still standing - but it's a wonder how with the stories of chimney fires. About a third of the barns here are gone from fires.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,680
central pa
You dont get creosote if you are burning hot and clean. I expect when that church install is used that poor stove is running flat out on hopefully dry wood.
Only if you can keep the exhaust above the condensation point till it exits the chimney.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
4,638
Northern NH
Only if you can keep the exhaust above the condensation point till it exits the chimney.
You are mixing up two phenomena, if the wood is fully combusted be it an old style boiler like mine, a gasifier or a catalyst or a woodstove cranked wide open , you can subcool the exhaust and still not get creosote. You will get condensed water vapor which will run down the stack and possibly rust it out but in order to get creosote you need to start with combustible condensable vapors leaving the stove. The reason these vapors are leaving the stove are they are incombustible like water or they did not burn completely in the stove.

The old UMaine design (Jetstream, Madawaska ) put out water vapor up the stack and that was about it. It could be subcooled but its lot easier to exhaust vapor due to icing. The Europeans use condensing heat exchangers on larger biomass boilers made out of stainless steel before exhausting out a stainless stack.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
2,801
Downeast Maine
You are mixing up two phenomena, if the wood is fully combusted be it an old style boiler like mine, a gasifier or a catalyst or a woodstove cranked wide open , you can subcool the exhaust and still not get creosote. You will get condensed water vapor which will run down the stack and possibly rust it out but in order to get creosote you need to start with combustible condensable vapors leaving the stove. The reason these vapors are leaving the stove are they are incombustible like water or they did not burn completely in the stove.

The old UMaine design (Jetstream, Madawaska ) put out water vapor up the stack and that was about it. It could be subcooled but its lot easier to exhaust vapor due to icing. The Europeans use condensing heat exchangers on larger biomass boilers made out of stainless steel before exhausting out a stainless stack.
I do like the efficiency of European designs, but not necessarily the aesthetic of the modern stuff. The US doesn't have the same culture of efficiency.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,680
central pa
You are mixing up two phenomena, if the wood is fully combusted be it an old style boiler like mine, a gasifier or a catalyst or a woodstove cranked wide open , you can subcool the exhaust and still not get creosote. You will get condensed water vapor which will run down the stack and possibly rust it out but in order to get creosote you need to start with combustible condensable vapors leaving the stove. The reason these vapors are leaving the stove are they are incombustible like water or they did not burn completely in the stove.

The old UMaine design (Jetstream, Madawaska ) put out water vapor up the stack and that was about it. It could be subcooled but its lot easier to exhaust vapor due to icing. The Europeans use condensing heat exchangers on larger biomass boilers made out of stainless steel before exhausting out a stainless stack.
Yes if you really had complete combustion you would be correct. Unfortunately that is not possible.
 

BethelStrong

Member
Dec 12, 2018
146
Ohio
Around here there is an open air museum - 100acres with a small town and farmsteads replicating the mid 1800s. I look at their stove setups and wonder how they survived. Long pipeing runs like those pictured, suspended by stove wire, small hearth pads, leaky box stoves. A few larger buildings have the stove in the center, chimney off to the side with 10 to 30ft horizontal runs. Most smaller houses and buildings had tiny tin sheet hearth pads with wood floors beneath and all around. But they seem to have done alright.
Nobody remembers the failures


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Adabiviak

Feeling the Heat
Dec 7, 2008
356
Sierra Nevadas, California
This install was posted several years back. At least it had enough pitch to stay fairly clean according to the poster.
View attachment 236602
Oh wow, that's almost identical to my house, but I left my stove in the center(ish) of the wall to keep any bends out of the stack (plus it's a little more in the center of the room for even heating)... they must have really wanted it in the corner.