Alderlea T6 maintenance checks

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,577
South Puget Sound, WA
The boost manifold is the angled plate in the front lower inner part of the stove, right at the bottom of the door opening. It should lift right out. Nothing to worry about with the stove, just keep burning. If you want to know how the chimney is doing, clean it after burning the first cord.
 

mcstatz5829

Member
Jul 11, 2018
147
Indianapolis
The boost manifold is the angled plate in the front lower inner part of the stove, right at the bottom of the door opening. It should lift right out. Nothing to worry about with the stove, just keep burning. If you want to know how the chimney is doing, clean it after burning the first cord.
Is that the same as the boost tube cover? It looks fine but the whole area was packed with ashes. I cleaned it out.

The manual says to use up to 20” length and load “end wise”

I’ve been using splits up to 19” and loading N/S. Those hang well over the boost manifold and I think contribute to the ashes.

E/W there is 20” from firebrick to firebrick but the opening is less than 19”.

I’m curious how the manufacturer intended 20” splits to be loaded.
 

vwmike

Feeling the Heat
Oct 7, 2013
253
Chilliwack, BC, Can.
Is that the same as the boost tube cover? It looks fine but the whole area was packed with ashes. I cleaned it out.

The manual says to use up to 20” length and load “end wise”

I’ve been using splits up to 19” and loading N/S. Those hang well over the boost manifold and I think contribute to the ashes.

E/W there is 20” from firebrick to firebrick but the opening is less than 19”.

I’m curious how the manufacturer intended 20” splits to be loaded.

It’s kind of a nominal measurement like a 2x4 or a big screen tv... yes you can get one or two 20” pieces in there, but I wouldn’t want my whole shed full of 20” wood!! Some manufactures are better about it than others.
 

mcstatz5829

Member
Jul 11, 2018
147
Indianapolis
I wrote PE:

I said:
The manual says to load up to 20” splits “endwise”. What is endwise? The length of the split going from front to back, or side to side?

PE said:
Thank you for purchasing one of our stoves.

"Endwise" means placing your firewood straight in, with the split running front to back.

I said:
Thanks! When I load anything over 18” like that, the ashes cover the boost manifold. Is that an issue? should I attempt to keep my splits under 18”?

[QUOTE="PE”]
If the ash is as high as the boost manifold, you may want to remove some of it after the stoves cools down.

When reloading my stove at home, I pull the hot coals forward keeping them clear of the small holes in the boost manifold and then place more wood on top of them. Length of the wood doesn't matter as long as it fits inside the firebox.
[/QUOTE]

I take this to mean, given the physical dimensions of the stove, I should probably max out at 18” splits
 

bfast250

Burning Hunk
Dec 6, 2013
111
Missouri
I don't have the same stove, but very similar firebox. I noticed the creasote build up inside the exposed metal too. I have cleaned my chimney twice with the sooteater and had very little build up. I think it's normal.

I try to keep my splits to 18" max if loading n/s. Any longer than that and it makes a mess as you have pointed out.

BTW your baffle looks brand new! How long have you been using the stove?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,577
South Puget Sound, WA
18" splits are what goes in our T6 for N/S loading. I don't rest splits on the front ledge. A 20" split will squeak in E/W but just. I don't like scraping and banging the firebrick so the few 19" splits are the longest I'll load E/W.
 
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Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
It is not an issue to rest the splits on the boost manifold plate. It is easy to clear ash from the holes, just tilt the plate upward forward and back a few times, then use your poker hook to swipe any remaining ash side to side away from the holes. That is what I do every reload. Never had an issue with ash in the boost holes. Once in a while when it is cool or coolish, I put on the welding gloves and pull up the boost manifold and clean any ash from underneath it. Set back down and go. Keep in mind the anythi9ng an inch or two away from the glass is going to offgas onto the glass from the ends of the splits, which usually clouds the glass. But most will burn off.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,577
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, I didn't mean to imply that it was wrong to do this, I just don't do it. I like a clean window.
 

mcstatz5829

Member
Jul 11, 2018
147
Indianapolis
I don't have the same stove, but very similar firebox. I noticed the creasote build up inside the exposed metal too. I have cleaned my chimney twice with the sooteater and had very little build up. I think it's normal.

I try to keep my splits to 18" max if loading n/s. Any longer than that and it makes a mess as you have pointed out.

BTW your baffle looks brand new! How long have you been using the stove?
First year with it - was brand new this summer. Only been burning a month, and not full time
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Yes, I didn't mean to imply that it was wrong to do this, I just don't do it. I like a clean window.
I was responding to the OP's concerns. I myself also like to stay away from the glass, as I like the view. But, when it is 9 degrees out and I am out in my skivvies getting splits, I am less worried about length, than I am about getting the stove loaded with what I brought in, and not having to make another trip outside. ;-)